Religious tourism in Italy

Religious tourism in Italy

When travelling to Italy you will probably notice the influence Christianity had in the art and architecture in the country. The spirituality is a strong reason to visit the country for many people. If you’re looking to make a pilgrimage or to have a vacation with a religious element, then Italy is really a great place to visit. Here are some of the most important places to visit in Italy for a religious tourism.

  • Vatican. St. Peter’s Cathedral not only represents the core of Catholicism, but also the largest church in the world. Many people visiting Italy make sure to make a stop in Rome, which makes a trip to Vatican City not only easy, but inevitable in many cases. If you’re a Catholic then visiting Vatican is a once in a lifetime experience that allows one to feel a connection with the Church and feel its power. After St. Peter, the other cathedrals like St. Maria Maggiore, San Giovanni inLaterano and San Paolo fuori le Mura should be on your list.
  • Divino Amore. While in Rome you should visit the Santuario del Divino Amore (Divine Love), where faithful go to pray for miracles. While there are reports that many prayers have been answered here, the real experience is the overall feeling of spirituality. Many people walk to the sanctuary from the city at night. It is a 15 mile walk, and groups gather almost every night to walk together while praying, singing or simply repenting.
  • Loreto.  Loreto is home to the most important sanctuary in the world. Such prestige comes from the Santa Casa (The Holy House) that is believed to be the house of Mary before she married Joseph, the house where she received the announcement from the archangel Gabriel of the coming of her Son, Jesus Christ.
  • Assissi. Assisi is the world capital of peace and the city of two great saints, St. Francis and St. Clare, good friends in real life and extraordinary examples of love and peace. Assisi is the center of many religious activities and stands in favor of world peace, but it also gently and elegantly holds on to its Franciscan traditions, well represented by the monumental frescos from Giotto.
  • The Holy Shroud in Turin. The Holy Shroud is the cloth that is said to have covered Jesus after His burial. A very detailed image of the corpse of Christ is miraculously projected on the cloth and, two thousand years later, people are still trying to explain how. The Shroud is kept in a closed place in Turin, but every 25 years and on special occasions it is actually shown to the general public. Since 2000 it has been on display twice and seeing it is a truly unique experience.

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